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Jerome Manson

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Love to play, watch, study, drink and eat everything tennis. It's a wonderful sport and consumes my life! I also like to watch other sports and travel around the United States.

Author's Articles:

It’s been a topic for years now - when will Roger Federer fall out of the elite conversation in men’s tennis? 2013 is no different as doubters continue to predict the demise of the 17 time grand slam winner. He finished 2012 leaving a bitter taste in his followers’ palates, losing to Andy Murray in the 2012 Summer Olympics gold medal game in three sets, winning the Western & Southern Open at Cincinnati over Novak Djokovich, losing in the quarter final of the U.S. Open to the Czech Republic’s Tomas Berdych in four sets, and finishing the year losing tournaments in China, Switzerland, and London. The poor ending to 2012...

With the second month of the MLB season underway, the first month brought about some major surprises for professional baseball. What many of us thought would happen, such as Strasburg dominating or the Dodgers and Blue Jays taking over their divisions with expensive players, hasn’t, at least yet. There are some great story lines that will be fun to track as May heats up into June. Some of these include the initial home run bursts by Justin Upton and Chris Davis, Clay Buchholz dominating for the Red Sox, and Josh Hamilton conforming to his usual very-hot or very-cold (the latter accurately describes his play to start the season) batting...

Remember when Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer was the greatest matchup in tennis? Number one versus number two, seemingly vying back and forth for the #1 and #2 spots in the ATP. This was until Novak Djokovic sprinted past them both in 2011, claiming the #1 rank for himself. Djokovic has held a tight grip over the top spot while media outlets continue to erode the present-status of Nadal and Federer. While many may think Federer is too old to compete and Nadal is too beat up, this is not the case to me. That’s why in 2013, Nadal and Federer will reclaim their respective tournaments and thwart Djokovic from replicating Laver’s taking of...

Only once in the past 32 Grand Slam tournaments has a man outside the “Big Four” of Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Roger Federer, and Rafael Nadal won a major tournament in men’s tennis. In economic terms, men’s tennis is an oligopoly – meaning it is dominated by a very small number of elite players. Djokovic has controlled the Australian Open as of late, Nadal has nearly monopolized Roland Garros since 2005, and the dominance of Roger Federer at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open has been equalized among Murray, Djokovic, Nadal (and Juan del Potro in 2009). Will we see the same trend develop throughout tennis as Federer continues to age...